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  #1  
Old Aug 21, 2003, 10:37 AM
robnz robnz is offline
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Question Origins of 'Shedding'

I heard that the origin of musicians calling their instrument their 'axe' comes from Woody Herman's saxophone section playing the Woodchoppers Ball. Is that true?

Did the expression 'Going out to the woodshed' used to mean playing that tune and then morph into describing intense practicing?

Hey Morgan, Nimish, or another young player; do you ever use the term 'woodshedding' to describe practicing or is it just 'shedding' now?
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  #2  
Old Aug 21, 2003, 11:55 AM
Morgan Childs Morgan Childs is offline
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Dave, I always heard the story was that when Charlie Parker went to practice (and came back blowing the new shit) he was practicing in an ACTUAL woodshed. But maybe I invented that or picked it up from some unreliable source.... to answer your question, Hells yes, I always say "back to the woodshed", especially after getting my ass kicked on the bandstand by my betters. But if somebody asks me what I'm up to, I'll say "just 'shedding".
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  #3  
Old Aug 24, 2003, 11:38 AM
Ryga Ryga is offline
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Okay how about this - you guys ever heard the term 'dropping an axe'?
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  #4  
Old Aug 25, 2003, 03:34 AM
Nimish Nimish is offline
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I don't hear people say woodshedding, I usually hear shedding. I myself reserve the word shedding for the real heavy duty practice sessions where the blood is pumping and all that sort of thing

At school I also hear podding, if you are going to practice in the drum pods and stuff like fiending out in the cave if you are going to practice in the windowless caves in the back. There where a lot of really good ones that I don't remember though

I heard what you heard robnz about axes and instruments

never heard of dropping an axe, what does it mean? a hipper version of dropping the bomb?

anyway, I still have a few logs to kindle
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  #5  
Old Aug 25, 2003, 09:23 AM
Mark Eisenman Mark Eisenman is offline
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Cool

No Cam,

i've never dropped an 'axe'.
But I have dropped a "log".


Watchdog
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  #6  
Old Aug 25, 2003, 03:22 PM
Allan Johnston Allan Johnston is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ryga
Okay how about this - you guys ever heard the term 'dropping an axe'?
Hey Cam - are you ever gonna tell us what it means?
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  #7  
Old Aug 25, 2003, 05:20 PM
Ryga Ryga is offline
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Yes Allan, our new buddy 'Watchdog' just hit the nail on the head. We can use this term in a sentence like - 'Excuse me guys, I gotta go drop an axe' Always a crowd pleaser.

And how about a big hand for our friend Robnz back there on the drums for having brought this whole topic to light! This thread probably didn't go quite the way he was hoping, but hey, what the hell - at least it gave us something to think about!
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  #8  
Old Aug 25, 2003, 06:03 PM
Allan Johnston Allan Johnston is offline
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I see...

While we're almost on the subject - anyone know who coined the musical phrase "stepped on my dick"? I know it wasn't me. And why are 'clams' called clams?
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  #9  
Old Aug 27, 2003, 04:44 PM
Ryga Ryga is offline
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I know we're taking a pretty serious left turn here Allan, but in the words of one Jim Ignatowski -

'I understand why an orange is called and orange, but why isn't an apple called a red? I mean I understand blueberries, but SOMEBODY explain gooseberries!'

Which goes hand in hand with the Ukrainian addage which is as follows: 'If a pig in a pen's called a poke - why then is a poke in the ass called a goose?'

Just a couple thoughts for the day.
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  #10  
Old Aug 28, 2003, 01:18 AM
Nimish Nimish is offline
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from the Orange Site

The word is possibly ultimately from Dravidian, a family of languages spoken in southern India and northern Sri Lanka. The Dravidian word or words were adopted into the Indo-European language Sanskrit with the form nraga. As the fruit passed westward, so did the word, as evidenced by Persian nrang and Arabic nranj. Arabs brought the first oranges to Spain, and the fruit rapidly spread throughout Europe. The important word for the development of our term is Old Italian melarancio, derived from mela, “fruit,” and arancio, “orange tree,” from Arabic nranj. Old Italian melarancio was translated into Old French as pume orenge, the o replacing the a because of the influence of the name of the town of Orange, from which oranges reached the northern part of France. The final stage of the odyssey of the word was its borrowing into English from the Old French form orenge. Our word is first recorded in Middle English in a text probably composed around 1380, a time preceding the arrival of the orange in the New World.


from the Gooseberry Site

'Goosberry' has been the common name for this plant in the English language from at least as far back as the 15th century. It is known that gooseberry preserve was favoured when serving a goose.
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  #11  
Old Aug 28, 2003, 10:25 AM
John Korsrud John Korsrud is offline
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'I understand why an orange is called and orange, but why isn't an apple called a red? I mean I understand blueberries, but SOMEBODY explain gooseberries!'

Which goes hand in hand with the Ukrainian addage which is as follows: 'If a pig in a pen's called a poke - why then is a poke in the ass called a goose?'


It also reminds me of resident social analyst Ross Taggart's pondering..."It's too bad they didn't put a deer on our dollar coin instead of a loon...then instead of a looney we could of called it 'a buck' ".
Very good Ross.

Here's another one of my favorite Taggart-isms...
Q. What does Elmar Fudd do when he takes his clothes out of the washer?




A. Phil Dwyer
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  #12  
Old Aug 29, 2003, 07:25 AM
Phil Dwyer Phil Dwyer is offline
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You see, this is what happens. A guy leaves town and sure enough 14 years later the rumours are still flying around like crazy. I have never, and I repeat never, been associated with Elmer Fudd. There was an incident at #5 Orange several years ago with a Natasha Fudd, but that all got straightened out by the lawyers. The fact that Mr Taggart is spreading this sort of trash about me is no doubt a reflection of some sort of insecurity related to his use of soft reeds.
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  #13  
Old Aug 29, 2003, 05:56 PM
Ryga Ryga is offline
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oooOOOHH BOY!! This is gettin' GOOD!

Hey it's not the first time Elmer Fudd's been taken out of context. 'Wicker box' for example, I've been told that's what Elmer Fudd would like to do to Madonna.
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  #14  
Old Aug 29, 2003, 07:31 PM
Allan Johnston Allan Johnston is offline
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http://rinkworks.com/dialect/dialect...Findex.sh tml
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