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  #61  
Old Aug 25, 2005, 01:56 AM
Bill Sample Bill Sample is offline
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Re: tenor player

Quote was "greatest tenor player I ever heard in Victoria". They're all great players, so it's just my opinion. Nothing 'unfair' about that. Are you after something else? I'm not really too interested in working this thread any further. It's a small world.
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  #62  
Old Aug 25, 2005, 02:21 AM
NoahBecker NoahBecker is offline
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No, I'm not after anything Bill. That was just my opinion of your opinion.
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  #63  
Old Aug 27, 2005, 07:25 AM
Clamato Clamato is offline
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Playing Over Chord Changes

HI , gang! I just want to say that this is a very enjoyable forum. Well, I've settled in my room in the Royal Lancer Apartments. I'm still a little shy to bring my recorder out.I'm sure there are ALOT other recorder players who can really jam in this town.If there are any on this forum, please make yourself known.
I wanted to share that I've had sort of a breakthrough with my jazz playing. It's kind of funny, but I just realized that the chord symbols in the Real Book are what you are supposed to improv with! I thought those things were just for the guitar player! I guess I have to start over with my jazz playing, which is a little frustrating, but I am determined to get at least to the C's in the Real Book by Christmastime.
Colors of Chloe, here I come!
Here's another question, and if anyone out there knows the answer, I will personally take you to Don Mee Chinese Seafood Restaurant for some stir fried Squid! I'm wondering, if you have a minor Major 7th chord, HOW CAN IT BE MINOR AND MAJOR AT THE SAME TIME? This defies all logic as far as I'm concerned. It's like finding a chord at the nexus of the universe! Anyway, I'm dying to know what blues scale will work on this chord. Thanks in advance.
Clamato
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  #64  
Old Aug 27, 2005, 09:57 AM
Terry Deane Terry Deane is offline
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Thumbs up

Clamato, you,ve done it again. Bravo!
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  #65  
Old Aug 27, 2005, 12:17 PM
Mike Herriott Mike Herriott is offline
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Tenor players

Boy oh boy Noah sure has a knack for stirring things up eh? I think perhaps our finely decorated friend was ticked that he wasn't mentioned in the list of Victoria Tenor players... such a shame. In all of the excitement, you guys left out Ross Taggart, who is probably one of the finest musicians to be born and bred in Victoria. Definitely shines in the world of tenor saxophone players.

Anyway, if anyone is looking for an alto player to work with, Roy Styffe has just moved to Victoria. He has joined the Monday Night Big Band at Hermann's on lead alto and he is a fantastic player.

Now everyone stop picking on Noah... he can't help the way he is... just kidding Noah

MH
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  #66  
Old Aug 27, 2005, 04:37 PM
NoahBecker NoahBecker is offline
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Thumbs up

Thumbs way up to that Mike and Clamato!

Clamato, welcome to our fair city.

What say you Clamato? Have you jammed with any Victoria cats yet?
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  #67  
Old Aug 27, 2005, 05:35 PM
Clamato Clamato is offline
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Thumbs up Jammin!

Noah-
While it would be a dream come true to share the stage with some of you fine Victoria music makers, I'm still a bit shy to come out to sit in, only because I'm really at a beginner's level.Although I can play 2 of the 3 chromatic scales, plus I'm up to Bright Size Life in the "BOOK".( That's real New York slang for " Real Book" in case you weren't aware of that.Maybe there's a different slang for it out here, not sure...) Plus, I don't want to be shown up by the other recorder players in town( I'm assuming there must be at least several in most big cities-New York was FULL of jazz recorder players,every where you turned, it was SO intimidating.). Also, I have some facial scars from a knife fight I was involved in a few years ago when I was a member of New York Sports Club. I ACCIDENTALLY( hand to God!) wandered into the ladies shower, and this 5foot 3 brunette slashed the hell out of my face with her razor! So I'm a little self conscious about my appearance.
But I'm thinking , Noah, if you have some free time this week, maybe we could get together and "jam" or "session" or whatever you call it out here in B.C. I'm still curious about some of these chord thingys. Like when it says "b9" I think it means FLAT 9, and I'm lipping it down as far as I can , and it just sounds out of tune to me. Is this some sort of quartertone concept? Why would they purposely want you to play flat?I guess it's gonna take some time, but I'm determined to figure this stuff out.
I gotta go, I have some Stella D'oro Breakfast Treats in the microwave. Dinnertime!
Regards,
Clamato
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  #68  
Old Aug 28, 2005, 03:13 AM
NoahBecker NoahBecker is offline
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Thumbs up own up to it JT

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTCopper
All of my apologies, meant no disrespect to you. I made the mistake of hopping on this "train" started by someone else. All of my best and hope that you have a speedy recovery. Take care and I will delete all of my posts that I made in response to this thread started by someone else. Everyone seemed to have the same response, so I was just poking a little fun....my apologies.
For the record, the "Bad Vibes" are JT Copper's bad vibes.

If his original words were not deleted this thread would read very different.

Own up to this JT Copper.
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Last edited by NoahBecker : Aug 28, 2005 at 03:36 AM.
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  #69  
Old Sep 8, 2005, 04:45 PM
JTCopper
 
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uhhh....wtf? I am with Bill on this.....no bad vibes here at all mate.
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  #70  
Old Sep 10, 2005, 10:53 AM
Tony DiGregorio Tony DiGregorio is offline
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Wink

Hi Gents,
My wife and I played a little cafe (the Spiral Cafe) in Victoria last weekend and had a great time. She is a songwriter and i accompany on jazz guitar (we had a review of her CD in Monday Mag that week) and we love the city so much we were thinking of moving out next year. I don't know if there's room for a guitarist amongst all of you horn players but i guess we'll find out! Just an aside, i'll be setting up a recording studio once we get settled and i hope to do live recordings as well as in-house. Anyway I just wanted to say hi and looking forward to hearing you all swing.
cheers,
Tony Di Gregorio
www.starrynightstudios.com
www.kristia.com
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  #71  
Old Sep 20, 2005, 02:20 PM
NoahBecker NoahBecker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clamato
Noah-
While it would be a dream come true to share the stage with some of you fine Victoria music makers, I'm still a bit shy to come out to sit in, only because I'm really at a beginner's level.Although I can play 2 of the 3 chromatic scales, plus I'm up to Bright Size Life in the "BOOK".( That's real New York slang for " Real Book" in case you weren't aware of that.Maybe there's a different slang for it out here, not sure...) Plus, I don't want to be shown up by the other recorder players in town( I'm assuming there must be at least several in most big cities-New York was FULL of jazz recorder players,every where you turned, it was SO intimidating.). Also, I have some facial scars from a knife fight I was involved in a few years ago when I was a member of New York Sports Club. I ACCIDENTALLY( hand to God!) wandered into the ladies shower, and this 5foot 3 brunette slashed the hell out of my face with her razor! So I'm a little self conscious about my appearance.
But I'm thinking , Noah, if you have some free time this week, maybe we could get together and "jam" or "session" or whatever you call it out here in B.C. I'm still curious about some of these chord thingys. Like when it says "b9" I think it means FLAT 9, and I'm lipping it down as far as I can , and it just sounds out of tune to me. Is this some sort of quartertone concept? Why would they purposely want you to play flat?I guess it's gonna take some time, but I'm determined to figure this stuff out.
I gotta go, I have some Stella D'oro Breakfast Treats in the microwave. Dinnertime!
Regards,
Clamato
Hey Clamato,
Th Roland Juno 106 has all the Recorder sounds you need! Its got a huge array of sounds but it can sound very percussive and warm, kind of a polyphonic bass/rhodes sound that Q-tip uses a lot. But it can also have that great resonant sweepy dance kind of sound too. The juno goes for not so much anymore and its predecessor the Juno-60 goes for even less. The Juno-60 is said by some to have a warmer sound (specifically its filters) but the Juno-106 has many advantages, not the least of which being digitally controlled (but still analog) oscillators. The Juno 60, while its oscillators needn't be tuned as frequently as say, a minimoog, still drift in an out. Also, the Juno 60 was designed before MIDI was integrated in all of Rolands synths, but the 106 did have MIDI integration (albeit extremely primitive)

The Nord Lead 2 is a very versitile and really just astounding synth. It can suit any kind of music but you can definetly get that growling bass sound as well as that really good "clicky" Recorder sound i think you're talking about. The Waldorf Q is also very similar. Also, you might want to look into just getting a sequencing program like Reason, you could synthesize the sounds or use samples. Maybe the sound you are thinking of is acutally just a very commonly used sample of a an electric piano. Maybe look into a sample player like Kontakt.

My personal choice for finding a sound that i like is by using modular synthesis. More times than not, i can widdle the sound down to the one i was searching for. I usually use the Nord Modular synth for this.

I know this is probably way too much rambling but i hope it helps.
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  #72  
Old Sep 20, 2005, 04:19 PM
NoahBecker NoahBecker is offline
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I remember playing with you Clamato we played "alone together" and you set my ass on fire. afterwards, i just started laughing because you are one of the best players ive ever had the priveledge of playing duets with. "Clam" informed me that some of his space age, alien sounding **** (my description, not his) came from messian. then he asked me to loop a minor ii-V-i in d minor and he played over it using the mode. boy, was it scary.

the mode consists of three minor arpeggios a major third apart. the arpeggios "Clam" used over the d minor were c, e, and g minor triads. thinking about it from the d minor tonality (not on each individual chord in the ii-V-i), the scale lends itself to the flat 9, natural 9, 11, flat 5, sharp 5, natural 6, flat 7. stepwise, the pattern is less obvious then the trane/ slominsky pattern: 1/2 step, minor 3rd, 1/2, whole, 1/2, 1/2, minor 3rd.


another interesting thing is how the first formula overlaps with the second formula and how it can be applied on top starting from differnent points in the
symettrical structure.

anyway, it sounded absolutely amazing in Clam's hands. Hopefully this formulaic approach which i am cracking into in real time here with this post, inspired by slonimsky. I've never heard the recorder played like that before.
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  #73  
Old Sep 22, 2005, 03:50 PM
NoahBecker NoahBecker is offline
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Clam:

Here is some advice on how to make it in New York. Apply this knowledge to Victoria, just substitute the Empire State Building for the "Royal Lancer Apts.":

Some interesting thoughts from someone in NYC.

When Jason DuMars asked me to write something for the International Saxophone Home Page, I asked him what he thought the readers would most be interested in. Jason suggested that I share some information about my career and how I managed to produce my CDs. We agreed that it might be nice to offer some information to those saxophonists who are thinking about becoming full time musicians.

Sounds good to me. I always thought that in today's scene there were more than a few good issues to be addressed. Please bear in mind though, that the following may not necessarily appeal to everyone. It's merely a guide from my own experience, for what it's worth.

There are many ways to "make it" in the music business. It all depends on what you want. If I could give only one piece of advice, it would be this:

TAKE CARE OF THE MUSIC FIRST!

Of course, there's a lot of pressure to gain recognition, but if that's your biggest concern, this advice may not interest you. I've seen musicians devote a lot of energy to promotion at the expense of music, sometimes even putting down musicians who sit at home and practice. Impressive inroads are made in a very short amount of time. All the right people are met but once it becomes obvious that this person doesn't have the music to back it up they sort of fade into the background. Obviously there has to be a good balance between practicing, writing and promotion.

That said, my other piece of advice is:

DON'T WAIT FOR AN INVITATION!

There are some musicians who seem to expect opportunities to come to them rather than creating situations for themselves. Yea, you deserve it. Sure, the scene can be fucked up. So what? Rather than chasing it around, always one step behind, why not create your own niche? Make people come to you. If they don't, you'll still have your music. That's what it's about anyway, right? A career is only a means to that end, to serve the music and not the other way around. Once you confuse this issue you begin to create potential problems for yourself.

The basis for "taking care of the music first" means that you might actually have something worth promoting. Rather than trying to figure out why the phone doesn't ring, think about writing some music. There's nothing like a finished project to get you excited and give you the best reason in the world to promote yourself. Then it becomes mandatory; imperative for you to take the necessary steps to get it out there. Keeping focused on the music can help keep from developing a negative attitude. There's a lot that can discourage us, at least we have the creative process to keep us positive.

Beyond that, it's important to connect with people who inspire you or who are doing the kinds of things that you would like to do. I often notice a self defeating attitude among musicians in which those who are successful are looked upon as having "gotten over" somehow. This is just plain alienating. It's easy to become frustrated by the success others may have attained. Believe me, it's a small scene and there's not that much that separates us. If somebody's music reaches you, go after them! Deal with it on a human level. Share your excitement and be real. There's nothing like a great performance to motivate you into starting a conversation with someone you don't know. So it's uncomfortable at first. Big deal.

Taking care of the music is important for a larger reason as well. In my opinion the jazz world has grown a little stale and somewhat artificial. There is a certain amount of support from the press and major record labels for music that is modeled after "classic" jazz but this fosters a "re-creative" atmosphere as opposed to a "creative" one. The music needs to be linked to the culture in some real way, not just through corporations who's interests in culture are negligible.

It's not enough to simply recreate the styles of the past. Think about what made those styles viable and wonderful in the first place. The music was born from the need to express a people's feelings about being alive in a certain time and place. Lasting music was made in the process but we should not assume that all that is needed is to dedicate ourselves to the nuts and bolts of the form. The music will not come to life simply by recreating the sum of it's parts. We have a responsibility to bring something to the music. The great musicians of the past were great because (among other things) they strove to put themselves into what they were doing. If we want to imitate them then let's do it the way they did it, by striving to create something of ourselves. Don't let anyone tell you it's not right or not good enough. And above all, don't be afraid to make mistakes! I recommend that everyone think about these things when composing and putting together groups. It's necessary in order for the music to evolve and necessary for your growth as an individual musician.

With that in mind I'll relate to you what my New York experience has been like. If it offers any insight for anyone, great. If not, that's OK too since we all have to figure it out ourselves on some level anyway.

Of course, I knew I would get some kind of work. In my case that meant doing every kind of gig imaginable from weddings to jazz gigs. Doing "commercial" work in New York was interesting enough since I've always had an interest in a variety of music. When you're working on your horn and learning the ropes, any time you've got your instrument in your face, that's a good thing. I viewed it as more or less temporary and was pretty happy since I was learning a lot and meeting new people all of the time.

One thing did begin to bother me however. Often the bandleader would preface a piece of music by saying "Okay, we want kind of a thing here", or perhaps a "Vida Loca". Well, that 's cool, but if I continue to do this, when is any body ever gonna say "how about giving us you're thing After all, people are developing their own voices. Nobody's telling them to sound like somebody else. Besides, there are a ton of cats out there who can and really want to do this kind of work. I needed a chance to develop my own thing. Not that I ever thought that what I do was ever going to be that commercially viable, but at least in my mind I can apply what I do to almost any situation. It's just a matter of convincing the rest of the world.

The break from that work came suddenly one night on a club date. We were playing a top 40 tune that had a small sax spot in it. This club date office could pick from almost anyone in the NY area, some name players in fact, so we could play our own solos. Or at least that's what I thought. The singer turned around to cue me in, so I closed my eyes and started to blow. I finished playing, looked up and noticed that he was still looking at me. In fact he looked horrified. He was supposed to be singing. Apparently he was lost . Jeez...sorry. I thought I played a pretty straightforward solo. The man was livid. I was amused. This was not appreciated. He told me that next time I'd better play it like the record. I declined and offered the advice that perhaps he'd do better with another saxophone player. My politeness was appreciated even less.

The next week I started looking for day work. Being depressed on a Saturday night because you're sure that everyone else is out there doing great things while you're playing bad top 40 is not good for your mental health. Day work at least gave me some dignity. Besides, I was able to meet more women this way.

Now I could make money while devoting my self strictly to the music I wanted to play. My plan was to hang out and eventually get a gig with one of the name bands, do the sideman thing, learn the ropes of the business then branch out on my own. Of course there were about 5,000 other tenor players thinking the same thing and maybe 3 gigs available. What actually happened turned out to be far better considering the way the scene was changing. This was the mid eighties and conservatism in jazz (not to mention politics) was spreading.

I had been on the scene for a few years by now, sitting in at all the clubs and trying to get noticed. As time passed I realized that gigs I was once interested in were seeming less and less attractive musically. In retrospect I can see that had I been successful in this endeavor my playing might have taken a different course. I think it would have actually taken me longer to get to where I am now. Not that I wouldn't have loved the opportunity to play with any of my heroes, it's just that my feelings about music were changing. I wanted to go in a different direction. The favored opinion of the day was that if you didn't apprentice with one of the greats you could not be expected to play correctly and therefore had no hope of ever being taken seriously. I didn't buy that.

I began putting my own groups together and soon found myself among a core group of like minded musicians, jamming, writing, and constantly talking about music. In the past, there had always been a subtle pressure to adapt to whatever the musical situation was. Now there was no pressure to conform. There was also no work. That didn't matter though, for the first time I really felt like I was doing what I was supposed to be doing.

The musicians I've always admired the most were the ones who lived their music every day. I made a decision that I always wanted to keep that feeling of true joy that I got at age 10 when I began playing. Why trade that in? It makes sense to keep that intact and hold out for what you really want. The only way anyone is going to know that you're serious is for them to see your dedication in action.
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  #74  
Old Sep 23, 2005, 03:47 PM
JTCopper
 
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Noah-
Some great things said.......nice!
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  #75  
Old Oct 4, 2005, 12:31 PM
Chuck Streatch Chuck Streatch is offline
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Are any of Walter "Bones" Eurechuck family still around?
Chuck Streatch

chuck@48north.com
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